Tag Archives: working in Japan

Interview – Teaching at an International School in Japan

Continuing with our series of interviewing people who are working and living in Japan, we have an interview from James who is now teaching English at an International Preschool in Tokyo. Teaching English in Japan is no doubt the most common job for most westerners looking to come work and live in Japan.

It can especially handy if you have been unable to study Japanese to a level where you can work in a Japanese business environment (N1-2 level), but still want to enjoy living and working here. It can be a nice temporary position for people until they move onto another position. For others teaching English is the perfect work-life balance and something they decide to make their key career for their entire time in Japan.

Teaching English in Japan is a booming industry in Japan and it is not going anywhere soon. James has some great insight into the industry and advice for anyone that is looking or interested in pursuing a teaching career here. Enjoy!

school

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Ask Yourself, “Can I work in Japan?”

 

can I work in Japan

No, I don’t mean you should ask yourself whether or not it is technically possible for you to work in Japan (after jumping through a series of hoops of various sizes and filling in an array of forms), but rather I mean that you should stop and ask yourself, ‘is Japan right for me?’.

If you decided to walk down the long winding path towards employment in Japan, make no mistake there will be many obstacles and challenges along the way. It will not be an easy path, and to keep ones ‘eye on the prize’ may test your resolve on more than one occasion. Therefore supposing upon running this gauntlet and then after reaching your destination you find that the reality is not what you expected, well (apart from wasting vast amounts of time and money) the disappointment would be immense.

So before we go ahead let’s take a few minutes out to step back and say

“Can I work in Japan”?

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Interview – Working in the Game Industry in Japan

We have a very special interview from Mike Paxman who is currently working in the mobile games industry here in Tokyo. Mike studied Japanese Language at the University of Sheffield, also helping to run the Japan Society on the side. 

He also used to run the extremely popular Japan is doomed blog and has contributed contents to other Japanese culture websites such as Tofugu.

Below is the interview we did together about advice for those who are who are interested in working in Japan and specifically the game industry! Some great contents and hope you enjoy!

Pac-Man

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Training in a Japanese Company Part 2 – Salaryman Boot camp

Hell you have met your match; its name…… Salaryman boot camp.

Welcome to part two of a series of articles looking at what happens after you make the best decision of your life and join a Japanese company. Specifically we are focusing on the training period.

For those that missed it, part 1 of the series looked at the pre-entry training (yep the training will often start BEFORE you even get in the company) . Pre-entry training is kind of like an early Christmas present, a Christmas present that punches you in the face and makes you write an apology letter. Oh yeah.

This article is the first that looks at the initial training you get AFTER entering the company.

Much like the external exams mentioned above, this gasshuku (Remote Training) isn’t in every company, but it is present in many. For those who don’t know any better the concept of business gasshuku sounds almost fun. You get to stay in a hotel for free, get free meals and also get to know the new people that have also joined the company. Plus if you are a foreigner all the Japanese you can handle! Heck most people have to pay for this!

In reality though gasshuku is often one of the toughest things that any shinnyuushain will go through, regardless of nationality. My own experience brought me down to my knees and almost had me leaving the company (and I like to think I don’t throw in the towel easily) I mean I made it through the recruitment process, and that was no walk in the park !

Training

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Training in a Japanese Company Part 1 – The Post Entry Training Period

Training

 

The Beginning of the End

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls. This is IT! This is the theme that got everything rolling. The big bang for Wijapan. It is the topic I always wanted to write about and the one I also wanted to avoid, due to it often bringing up un-pleasurable memories.

Now working in a Japanese company is one HELL of a big theme. We haven’t got that many articles here at Wijapan (YET!) but quite a few of them touch on working in a Japanese company. Jamie has introduced some of the annoyances to be found with everyday life here such as the good old hanko and your truly has talked about the diet surrounding working in a Japanese company and also a general outline of how to apply to one .

I would say though, more than anything that happens in the day to day life of working here, what has had the most lasting impression on me was the first two months, namely the kyouikukikan, the ‘training period’.

My first two months in a Japanese company were so mind boggling and shocking, that it made me realize that even though I had majored in Japanese language and culture for 4 years at university, spent one year living here as an exchange student and 6 months working for Mercedes Benz in Tokyo with many Japanese staff, I really knew nothing about what goes on in a traditional Japanese company or what it is like to work for one. I also think that unless you have experienced being here (or read this blog) you will never know.

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Working in Japan without Experience

Two years ago, right after I re-enrolled at UT Austin after my leave of absence to extend my study abroad program in Japan, one of Japanese language professors sent me an email asking me to talk to her class about opportunities in Japan.

I remembered the feeling of not really being able to see a light at the end of the tunnel as far as getting myself rooted in Japan after my study abroad at Sophia University.  I had never had a job even in the United States aside from helping with my father’s business.

Luckily for me, I had burned through all savings, scholarships and grants on partying with my new friends and anything that seemed slightly exotic. I started browsing around online for financial opportunities while living off of approximately 10 dollars a day for a couple weeks.  That soon turned to 5 dollars a day, and after a week of 3 dollars yen a day I really got moving. I was getting a little tired of Rice, Kimchi and Nattou for breakfast and dinner every day.

I lined up an interview  with one of the leading English Conversation Companies: GABA. I did my research, tried to think of anything that I have done in college that would count as “teaching experience” and pulled out my most formal clothes from the bottom of my suitcase.

Everything was going great until I was asked at the end of the interview to wear a suit to the second interview. I was more terrified at the thought of spending 300 dollars that I don’t have than I was excited at the fact that I passed the first interview. Thanks to UNIQLO, I was able to throw together what looked like a suit for about 100 dollars. I didn’t even have dress shoes so I had to throw down at 60 dollars at ABC mart for a decent pair. (I wish I knew then that you could get a seemingly decent pair in Shibuya for 20 bucks).

I made it to the second interview looking pretty sharp and it went pretty well. They asked me to wait two weeks while they considered my application.

Then, while taking a shower in my dorm on March 11th 2011, I started to feel really strange and found that I couldn’t stand up properly. After my shampoo bottle and everything else fell on my toes, I realized that an earthquake had struck. I ran out of the shower room in a towel to get to my room on the third floor. Once I made it to the staircase, I realized this was a big earthquake and just ran outside in the towel to meet all my dorm-mates and some of the Warabi-shi neighbors.

About a week later,  completely forgotten about my interviews at GABA, I got a phone call that went a little bit like this:

“Hello, is this Joseph?” , “This is he” , “So you’re still in Japan?” , “Yes…” “You’re still in Tokyo?” “Yes…” “Oh wow! Okay, well if you’re still interested in the position at GABA…”

And that’s one of the methods for getting a non-specialized job in Japan.

 Setsumeikai

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Japan Rules

Japan Rules Image

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I can always recall one of my earliest childhood memories of my “awakening” to Japan as a “modern country”, and not just as a land of the rising sun full of ninjas and samurai (TV can be a convincing media).

I was born and raised in the small town of Wednesbury in the UK. A village for most of its existence, when the Industrial revolution picked nearby Birmingham up and propelled it to Industrial “workshop of the world” Wednesbury was swept along in the pandemonium. Soon the banks of canals filled with barges laden fresh with coal for Birmingham’s roaring industries; brimmed to the edge with factories, workshops and steel mills – the modern age had arrived for this small town.

But history was not to be kind to Wednesbury. As fast as Industry had giveth life to the town it took it away. Post-war, as in other areas, British industrial output crumbled under the weight of cheaper foreign imports and factory closures, mass unemployment and mass unenjoyment soon followed. However as soon as the 90s began where once stood steel mills now stood shops, as the old abandoned land which once rang day and night to the sound hammers pounding steel now thronged with the crowds of Middle-England – row upon row of cars filled to impossibility with flat pack furniture and kitchen fittings crawling along the asphalt.

But that’s a story for another time, so let’s return to that 12 year old wide-eyed Wednesbury child – the most exotic thing in his life being an Indian curry. I clearly remember my father telling me about how his friend has been to Japan only to return flabbergasted, astounded by its neon metropolis and futurisms.

 “Everything they have is at least 10 years advanced of anything we have over here

That was it. That was all I needed. Japan from that point on cemented itself into my mind as certain kind of futuristic utopia. Everyday chores need not trouble, as your trusty robot would carry out those tasks. The flow of information is electronically controlled as everyday devices and appliances speak with each other to optimise your daily routines for maximised – Japanese style – efficiency. The age of men was over.

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Applying for a Working Holiday Visa Japan from the UK

This article is going to walk you through how to successfully apply for a Working Holiday Visa for Japan from the United Kingdom. I will supply the EXACT documents that I used and you are more than welcome to take them for yourself, alter them a little and submit them. Hell you can even just change my name to yours and submit them the way they are!

The Japanese Working Holiday Visa is an amazing visa that will allow the holder to stay in Japan for one year, allowing them to work an unlimited amount of hours. Now they do stress that this visa in NOT for people who are specifically looking to just work or study, the main focus should be travel with any side jobs there to help support this. This is a key thing to remember when filling in all the information for your  application.Below is a list taken form the Japanese government website detailing the general requirements of the applicant and also the documents required to be submitted.

British Passport Fully-loaded with a Beautiful Visa

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